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Interesting links and notes that might help people with Gilbert’s Syndrome

Find out more about how Milk Thistle works. The effective ingredient is sylmarin, and you need enough of a dose for it to have an impact. Read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/138.html

Diet plays a really important part in managing your health and wellbeing, and especially in helping your liver. However, there is an industry out there just waiting to push the latest ‘superfood’ your way. NHS ‘Choices’ gives the latest lowdown on the claims and offers the evidence to counter / support them here

Find ordinary household paints make you feel unwell? I’ve been using these for years and they are brilliant! www.ecosorganicpaints.co.uk Odourless, solvent free, totally non-toxic.

Breast Cancer and Gilbert’s Syndrome?

Discoveries of the potential issues for people with Gilbert’s Syndrome are occurring all the time. So little is known, and much is speculated!  I would caution before reading this that this cited article notes that the information they discuss results in their speculation that people with Gilbert’s Syndrome may be more likely to get breast cancer. This is not proven, and is an association only.  However, in the interests of offering new information to people with Gilbert’s Syndrome I present the conclusion below:

Med Hypotheses. 2011 Aug;77(2):162-4. doi: 10.1016/j.mehy.2011.03.047. Epub 2011 Jun 1.

Is Gilbert syndrome a new risk factor for breast cancer?

Source

Medical School, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. rafael.astolfi95@gmail.com

Abstract

Patients with Gilbert syndrome have an impaired function of the enzyme UGT1A1, responsible for the degradation of 4-OH-estrogens. These elements are produced by the degradation of estrogens and are well-known carcinogens. In theory, patients with Gilbert syndrome accumulate 4-OH-estrogens and, therefore, might have a higher risk for breast cancer, especially when exposed to higher levels of estrogens. If this theory is true, a new risk group for breast cancer would be described, producing new insights in breast carcinogenesis.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

The liver, the body’s largest solid organ, is responsible for detoxifying many of the potentially harmful substances that can pollute the body.

The liver also plays a critical role in many other body processes including energy production, digestion, and nutrient storage.

The cornerstone of any liver-friendly programme is a diet that makes relatively light work for this organ. The diet should contain an abundance of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Not only do these foods tend not to tax and stress the liver, they also contain an abundance of nutrients such as vitamin C and carotenoids (e.g. beta-carotene) which can support liver function.

Organic produce is best as this is relatively free of potentially toxic herbicides, pesticides and fungicides.

Foods that contain artificial additives such as sweeteners, colourings, flavourings and preservatives should be also be minimised in the diet.

Drinking plenty of water (about one and-a-half to two litres a day) should also help to reduce toxicity in your body and help take the load off your liver.

In addition, you might also benefit from taking something to ‘strengthen’ your liver. Perhaps most widely used as a general liver tonic is the herb Milk thistle. This herb has a traditional use that dates back more than 2000 years.

The herb contains a complex of bioflavonoid molecules known collectively as silymarin. Silymarin appears to have the ability to protect the liver cells by reducing the take-up and enhancing the removal of harmful toxins.Try 200 mg of standardised extract of Milk thistle, twice a day, throughout the festive season.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-202018/Can-I-prepare-liver-Christmas-parties.html#ixzz2GcEQAheY

Recipes for your liver

BETTER than a sandwich!

For a quick boost try the following super tasty liver loving lunch:

Quick pitta lunch

Wholemeal pitta bread, sliced open, spread with humous or tahini, add slices of avocado, a handful of watercress and spinach, and season with a dash of lemon juice, salt and black pepper. For extra nutrition and yumminess add sesame seeds or pine nuts or sunflower seeds. Scrumptious.

Wow! Tasty, quick POWER salad.

Puy lentil salad with soy beans, sugar snap peas & broccoli

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 200.0g Puy lentils
  • 1.0l hot vegetable stock
  • 200.0g tenderstem broccoli
  • 140.0g frozen soya beans , thawed
  • 140.0g sugarsnap peas
  • 1 red chilli , deseeded and sliced

Dressing

  • 2 tbsp sesame oil
  • juice 1 lemon
  • 1 garlic clove , chopped
  • 40.0ml reduced-salt soy sauce
  • 3cm piece fresh root ginger , finely grated
  • 1 tbsp clear honey

 Boil lentils in stock until just cooked, about 15 mins. Drain, then tip into a large bowl.

  1. Bring a saucepan of salted water to the boil, throw in the broccoli for 1 min, add the beans and peas for 1 min more. Drain, then cool under cold water. Pat dry, then add to the bowl with the lentils.
  2. Mix together the dressing ingredients with some seasoning.
  3. Pour over the lentils and veg, then mix in well with the chopped chilli. Pile onto a serving platter or divide between 4 plates and serve.

Per serving

302 kcalories, protein 22.0g, carbohydrate 42.0g, fat 7.0 g, saturated fat 1.0g, fibre 8.0g, sugar 9.0g, salt 1.41 g

Recipe from Good Food magazine.

Day or night, alone or with friends – tasty goodness.

Avocado and black bean wraps

Serves 4 for a filling meal, or halve the quantities and serve with a leafy salad for a lighter lunch.

Ingredients

  • 8 wholemeal wraps (in world food isle with Mexican stuff, or in bakery section)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion , chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves , chopped
  • 1 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp ground cumin
  • 5 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 3 tbsp clear honey
  • 3 x 400g cans black beans , rinsed and drained
  • choose a few toppings-  diced avocado, salsa, sliced jalapeño peppers
  • crème fraîche / yoghurt or Tabasco / hot pepper sauce, to serve

Serve with green salad, sliced tomatoes, or green beans and sweetcorn.

  1. In a large frying pan, heat the oil. Add the onion and garlic, and cook for 5 mins.
  2. Add the spices, vinegar and honey. Cook for 2 mins more.
  3. Add the beans and some salt / pepper, and heat through.
  4. Remove from the heat and mash the beans gently with the back of your spoon to a chunky purée.
  5. Spread some beans over wraps, scatter with your choice of toppings and add a spoonful of crème fraîche / yoghurt to cool down, or a splash of Tabasco / hot pepper sauce to spice it up.
  6. Roll up and YUM!

Sin free sinning!

This wonderful recipe is from a very good friend:

Fat free fudgy wudgy brownies

Preheat the oven to 180C

Dry ingredients:

¾ cup of wholemeal flour

¼ cup cocoa powder

½ cup white flour

1 tsp baking powder

½ cup Demerara sugar (or brown sugar)

¾ cup broken walnuts (optional)

Handful dark chocolate chips (optional)

Mix the dry ingredients together in a bowl.

Wet ingredients:

1 ½ cups black beans (one tin drained and rinsed well)

1 cup pitted medjool dates (this can be anywhere from 7-10 dates depending on their size, or just use ordinary dried dates if you don’t want to fork out for medjool)

¼ cup maple syrup (or date syrup, which is particularly tasty, or indeed any other kind of syrup)

Whiz the wet ingredients together in a food processor until completely smooth.

Then add:

1 TB balsamic vinegar (or cider vinegar)

3 tsp instant coffee (optional but enhances the flavour)

1 tsp vanilla essence

2 TB flax meal (ground flax seeds) or other ground seeds such as hemp powder

1 cup water

Whiz that all up until it is smooth, then mix in with the dry ingredients.

Spoon into a greased 9×12 or 9×13 pan.

Bake for 14 minutes then take the pan out and rotate it and put it back in for another 14 minutes. Test with a toothpick to see if it comes out clean. If not put it in for 2 more minutes.

Let cool before you slice. Slice it into 16 brownies-4 by 4.

Store in an airtight tin. I think they taste better the next day. Yum!

 

Detox diets and Gilbert’s Syndrome

I’ve been monitoring the ‘de-tox diet’ phenomenon for many years, and each year my scepticism grows. Avid marketers have spotted a desire for many people to find a solution to the modern malaise of feeling tired and sluggish, and there is a proliferation of products – powders / pills / soups /  excercises / regimes / books / websites / treatments etc that claim to help powerfully cleanse the body and leave you lighter, fresher, and generally bright eyed and bushy tailed.

However, on the one hand many run of the mill Doctors will tell you that the liver does a perfectly good job of dealing with toxins. On the other hand many people feel generally under par much of the time. Although I agree that the liver generally does an excellent job, some of us may need a wee bit more help for our liver to do the job we want it to.  Given the disadvantage that those with Gilbert’s Syndrome experience, with a reduced capacity to process certain toxins, it makes sense to me to look after my diet so that I can help my liver. But I don’t want to burden my body with the shock of suddenly changing my diet to all fruit or liquid or pureed broccoli or whatever. My message would be to make a lifestyle choice to ensure you feel better EVERY day.

So, what can we all agree on?  Well, water is good for you. Drink plenty of it. Alcohol may be ok in small quantities, but personally it makes me feel awful so I avoid it. Caffeine can mess up your blood sugar levels and so reduce your ability to maintain consistent energy, particularly because those with Gilbert’s Syndrome are lacking in an enzyme that needs stable blood sugar levels for it to work properly. Eat little and often to keep your energy up, but make sure you stick to wholefoods such as brown rice, wholemeal bread, crackers, jacket potatoes etc and plenty of vegetables and fruit and not high fat food. This will help you maintain a steady weight, not experience hunger pangs, as well as avoiding over burdening your liver with fat processing. Protein is supposed to help with extra energy. I avoid eating animals and animal products for environmental reasons as well as health and compassionate reasons, so my sources of protein tend to be marmite (full of an awesome range of vitamins), and nut butters, such as peanut butter and cashew butter (high in fat but replace margarine and used as my only source of fat– don’t rule it out completely as your body does need fat), avocado, hemp powder added to soups and dressings, plus lots of soya milk.

Star liver foods include: broccoli, garlic, turmeric, avocado, beetroot, apples, lemons, walnuts.

If you need caffeine then try swapping to green tea which is better at cleansing the liver, and more gentle to your system than coffee.

Don’t forget a little naughty treat is ok. But use it as a reward for staying generally more liver conscious and once a week rather than every day. I like the 80 / 20 rule – stay 80% within a good diet, then the other 20% ain’t so bad.

Helping you deal better with toxins

Good news! The de-tox process of the liver which won’t work as well for people with Gilbert’s Syndrome is called Glucuronidation and this process can be helped with Calcium D-Glucarate, glycine, magnesium, and b vitamins.

  • Calcium D Glucarate can be taken as tablets or capsules, but is also available in apples, brussels sprouts, broccoli, cabbage and bean sprouts.
  • Glycine is an amino acid and in high-protein foods, such as fish, meat, beans, milk, and cheese. Glycine is also available in capsule and powder forms, and as part of many combination amino acid supplements.
  • Spices, nuts, cereals, coffee, cocoa, tea, and vegetables are rich sources of magnesium. Green leafy vegetables such as spinach are also rich in magnesium as they contain chlorophyll. Magnesium supplements are widely available and often with calcium and vitamin c which help its absorption. The best absorbed types of magnesium are citrate and malate, rather than the cheaper form of oxide.
  • B vitamins are available in many different foods (see the NHS website), but the easiest ways of accessing them are through yeast extracts such as Marmite, and fortified cereals.

So why not help yourself and make sure your diet contains a good balance of foods that may help your liver to work better.

Pharmacist survey finds ‘Medicines detox’ puts people at risk

A recent article from Net Doctor has food for thought for those of us on long term medication. Please don’t take initiatives with your medication – talk to your Doctor or Pharmacist first! :

Patients are putting themselves at risk of serious harm by believing it is beneficial to occasionally stop taking long-term medicines in order to given their body a ‘detox’, experts have warned.

Research by the National Pharmacy Association (NPA) suggests that one in five people believe a so-called ‘medicines detox’ is beneficial.

However, the NPA warned that this could be seriously harmful for patients with conditions such as diabetes, asthma or depression, as they could lose control of their illness.

The survey, which was published during Ask Your Pharmacist Week (November 7th to 13th), also revealed that nearly one in three people believe it is safe to take non-prescription medicines that have been recommended for other people.

And some wrongly assume it is okay for a child to take an adult’s medication, as long as the dosage is reduced.

NPA head of information Leyla Hannbeck said: ‘There is a lot of misunderstanding about how medicines work in your body.

‘It’s important to get the right treatment and the right advice – which you can get from your local pharmacy, often without an appointment.’

Pharmacies provide a wealth of services in addition to dispensing medicines.

These include the disposal of unwanted medicines, promotion of healthy lifestyles and support for self-care.

Pharmacists can also provide personalised advice on medicines, smoking cessation support and guidance on sexual health.ADNFCR-554-ID-800789373-ADNFCR

General anesthesia in a patient with Gilbert’s syndrome.

Having had an operation this year, with a very understanding anesthesiologist, I know that this is an area of poor knowledge in the health service, and that all the advice you as a patient can offer is helpful, and will of course help yourself. We decided that morphine would be avoided and took an approach that would mean using as few drugs as possible. This also meant I would come out of the procedure more alert and able to get going.

There has been some recent research in India which follows the clinical experience I have personally had – namely that the best outcomes are if the drugs used avoid using the enzyme that people with Gilbert’s Syndrome are deficient in:

Source

Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Tata Main Hospital (TMH), Jamshedpur, India. Nag DS, Sinha N, Samaddar DP, Mahanty PR.

Abstract

Gilbert’s syndrome, caused by relative deficiency of glucuronyl transferase is the commonest cause of congenital hyperbilirubinemia. We report anesthetic management in a case of Gilbert’s syndrome for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Avoiding drugs which use this enzyme for its metabolisim or excretion, and minimizing the stress during the perioperative period allows safe conduct of anesthesia for these patients.

The Liver Diet

Think Raw
Eat plentiful amounts of raw fruits and vegetables, especially dark green leafy vegetables and orange, yellow, purple and red colored fruits and vegetables. Thirty to forty percent of the diet should consist of raw fruits and vegetables. Try to eat some raw fruits or vegetables with EVERY meal as they contain living enzymes, vitamin C, natural antibiotic substances and anti-cancer phytonutrients.

Oil but Don’t Grease Your Body
Avoid the fats that present a high workload for the liver and gall bladder. These are full-cream dairy products, margarines, processed vegetable oils (hydrogenated fats), deep fried foods, foods that are not fresh and contain rancid fats, preserved meats, animal skins and fatty meats. In those with a dysfunctional liver, I recommend avoiding all animal milks and substituting them with oat, rice, almond or soymilks. Eat the “good fats” which contain essential fatty acids in their natural unprocessed form.

These are found in cold pressed vegetable and seed oils, avocados, fish (especially oily fish such as salmon, tuna, sardines, herring, sablefish, flounder, trout, bass and mackerel), shrimp, prawns and crayfish, raw fresh nuts, raw fresh seeds such as flaxseeds (linseeds), sunflower seeds, safflower seeds, sesame seeds, hemp seeds, alfalfa seeds, pumpkin seeds and legumes (beans, peas and lentils). Seeds such as flaxseeds can be ground freshly everyday (in a regular coffee grinder or food processor) and can be added to cereals, smoothies, fruit salads and vegetables. Spirulina, evening primrose oil, black currant seed oil, borage oil and lecithin also contain healthy oils to help the liver. Do not use butter and/or margarine on your breads and crackers. Replace them with tahini, humus, pesto, tomato paste or relish, freshly minced garlic and cold pressed oil (chilli or other natural spices can be added if enjoyed), nut-spreads, fresh avocado, cold pressed olive oil or honey. The good fats are essential to build healthy cell membranes around the liver cells. As we get older we need to “oil” our bodies and not “grease” our bodies.

Think Natural
Avoid artificial chemicals and toxins such as insecticides, pesticides, and artificial sweeteners and colorings, (especially aspartame), flavorings and preservatives. Excess alcohol, particularly spirits, should be avoided.

Be Diverse
Consume a diverse range of proteins from grains, raw nuts, seeds, legumes, eggs, seafood, and if desired, free range chicken (without the skin), and lean fresh red meats. If you do not want to eat red meat or poultry this is quite acceptable as there are many other sources of protein. It is safe to be a strict vegetarian, however you may need to take supplements of vitamin B 12, iron, taurine and carnitine to avoid poor metabolism and fatigue. To obtain first class protein, strict vegetarians need to combine 3 of the following 4 food classes at one meal – grains, nuts, seeds and legumes, otherwise valuable essential amino acids may be deficient. If your body is lacking amino acids you will be fatigued and you may suffer with mood changes, reduced cognitive function, hypoglycaemia, poor immune and liver function and hair loss. I have met many strict vegans who felt unwell because they were lacking amino acids, iron and vitamin B 12, and after supplementing with these nutrients and modifying their diets they quickly regained excellent health.

Let Food Be Your Medicine
Many diseases can be overcome by eating healing foods that contain powerful medicinal properties. Optimal health and the prevention of disease is only possible by including these healing foods regularly in the diet. The healing substances found in certain foods or therapeutically active chemicals are known as phytochemicals. The culinary habits of different cultures have been recognised for decades as being influential in the incidence of diseases. Mediterranean countries have a lower prevalence of cardiovascular diseases because of the protective effect of traditional Mediterranean foods, such as olive oil, tomatoes and legumes. Broccoli and other vegetables in the cruciferous family are known to reduce the risk of bowel cancer, but it is only recently that scientists have isolated the phytochemicals which confer this protection. Broccoli has been found to contain a phytochemical called sulphoraphane, which enhances the phase two-detoxification pathway in the liver.

Tomatoes contain a powerful antioxidant called lycopene, which according to a paper published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (1997:66:116-22), is the most powerful of all the dietary carotenoids. The researchers found that the dietary intake of lycopene was linked to a lower risk of prostate problems. They also found that higher levels of lycopene in the blood lowered the risk of cell proliferation, which would theoretically
exert a powerful anti-cancer effect. Cooking or chopping tomatoes increases the absorption of lycopene into the body. Cooking tomatoes in oil increases the availability of the lycopene to the body, which is another reason that Mediterranean cuisine confers health benefits.
Beetroot is a beautiful deep purple colour because it contains the antioxidant anthocyanidin. Constituents of beetroot have been shown to exert anti-viral and anti-tumour effects in animal studies. Other foods, which also exert these properties, although to a lesser degree, are red and green peppers, red onion skins, paprika and cranberry. These foods contain healing phytonutrients such as carotenoids, capsanthin and anthocyanins.

Certain foods have high concentrations of plant hormones, which are known as phytoestrogens. Examples of these are the isoflavones genistein and daidzein (found in soya beans and red clover), and lignans (found in flaxseed). Asian communities consume a high intake of soy (approximately 25 – 50 grams daily), and have a significantly lower incidence of hormone dependent cancers of the prostate, uterus and breast. All legumes such as beans, peas and lentils contain beneficial phytoestrogens.

A study published in the British Medical Journal in 1990, looked at a group of postmenopausal women who were given 45 grams of soy flour for 2 weeks, followed by 25 grams of flaxseed meal for 2 weeks, and then 10 grams of red clover sprouts. This produced improvements in various blood hormone levels and menopausal symptoms.
Asian and Mediterranean cuisines are now integrating themselves into the old fashioned Western diet consisting of meat, bread and 4 vegetables. This culinary multiculturalism has enormous and proven benefits for our health and also for our enjoyment. We all know that variety is the spice of life, and Asian and Mediterranean foods can add spice to our often-bland ways of eating. A wide range of Asian foods is now available from supermarkets and greengrocers as well as Chinese grocery stores. Typical Asian foods and vegetables such as ginger root, chilli, garlic, Chinese water spinach, bok choy, lemongrass, coconut, tumeric, curry, Chinese mushrooms and many others can be experimented with, and gradually introduced into the diet if you want to expand the horizons of your taste buds.

Watch That Sweet Tooth
Use natural sugars from fresh fruits and juices, dried fruits, honey, molasses, fruit sorbets, fruit cakes, fruit jams, carob, date sugar, maple sugar or syrup or rice syrup. Avoid refined white sugar and candies, fizzy drinks, cakes and biscuits made with refined sugars. If you find you crave these foods on a regular basis you may have the very common metabolic imbalance known as Syndrome X. By following the eating principles and taking nutrients to rebalance the metabolism you can get cravings under control making weight loss and maintenance of energy much easier. See ‘Syndrome X’

Rehydrate Your Body
Drink large amounts of fluids such as water, raw juices and teas (green tea, herbal and regular weak tea is fine). Aim for 2 liters of fluid daily and this will avoid constipation problems and help your kidneys to eliminate the toxins that the liver has broken down. Use a household water filter. Water filters with sub-micron, solid carbon block filters are able to remove parasites and many toxic chemicals. Shop around and take a look at different types of filters before you buy and get professional advice as technology is improving rapidly.

The liver is the major organ involved in detoxification, however it is still important to support the other body organs of elimination. The skin and the kidneys eliminate toxins through sweating and urine and this is why saunas and a high intake of filtered water can reduce symptoms of toxic overload.

Go Organic
ALTHOUGH IT IS IDEAL TO BE ABLE TO PURCHASE AND CONSUME ORGANIC PRODUCTS, THIS MAY NOT ALWAYS BE FEASIBLE OR POSSIBLE BECAUSE OF FINANCIAL OR LOGISTICAL REASONS. PLEASE DO NOT BECOME TOO STRESSED BY THIS, AS EVEN IF THE FOOD YOU CONSUME IS NOT ORGANIC, THE TYPES OF FOODS YOU EAT ARE EVEN MORE IMPORTANT !!!

Not many people want to eat fruits and vegetables that have been sprayed repeatedly with insecticides and fungicides, ripened with ethylene gas and perhaps waxed with an insect secretion. It is a little off putting while biting into your lovely red juicy steak to think that this animal may have been fed antibiotics and the ground-up remains of thousands of dead animals, and had potent sex hormones implanted into it to accelerate its growth.

Organic food is sometimes called biodynamic food and is produced without synthetic herbicides, insecticides, fertilisers, post-harvest fungicides, antibiotic growth-promoters, or size enhancing hormones. It relies upon Mother Nature’s forces, recycling of nutrients and sustainable methods of production. Foods certified as organic must be grown on farms that are inspected and fully certified according to a stringent set of standards. Packaged and/or processed organic foods are free from artificial preservatives, colourings, flavourings or additives, and should not contain irradiated or genetically modified ingredients.

Pamper Your Liver
Eat foods to increase nutrients beneficial to liver function.These are:
Vitamin K – green leafy vegetables and alfalfa sprouts. Arginine – this helps the liver to detoxify ammonia, which is a toxic waste product of protein metabolism. Arginine is found in legumes (beans, peas, and lentils), carob, oats, walnuts, wheatgerm and seeds.
Antioxidants – found in fresh raw juices such as carrot, celery, beetroot, dandelion, apple, pear and green drinks like wheatgrass and barley-grass juice, and fresh fruits, particularly citrus and kiwi fruit.

Selenium – sources of the antioxidant selenium are brazil nuts, brewers yeast, designer yeast powders (very good source), kelp, brown rice, molasses, seafood, wheatgerm, whole-grains, garlic and onions.

Methionine – is essential for detoxification. Is found in legumes, eggs, fish, garlic, onions, seeds and meat.

Essential fatty acids – Seafood, cod liver oil, and fish oil. Seafood may be fresh, canned or frozen such as sardines, salmon, mackerel, tuna, trout, mullet, blue mussels, calamari, tailor, herring, blue eye cod, gemfish. Fresh avocado, fresh raw nuts and seeds, legumes (beans, peas, lentils), wholegrain, wheatgerm, green vegetables such as spinach, green peas and green beans, eggplant, cold pressed fresh vegetable and seed oils, freshly ground seeds, especially flaxseeds (linseed), evening primrose oil, black-currant seed oil, star flower oil. Essential fatty acids are required for healthy membranes in every cell of the body and plentiful amounts are required for healthy liver function. This is why strict low fat diets are not beneficial for general health, weight control or liver function.
Natural sulphur compounds – are found in eggs (preferably free range), garlic, onions, leeks, shallots and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage andBrussels sprouts.

Practice Good Hygiene
The liver filter removes microorganisms from the blood stream, which prevents them from getting deeper into the body where they may cause serious infections. To avoid overloading the liver filter it is important to avoid eating foods that are contaminated with high loads of unfriendly or dangerous (pathogenic) microorganisms.
Although standards of living and sanitation have improved, cases of food poisoning from parasites, bacteria and viruses have been gradually increasing. This is often due to poor hygiene, such as inadequate cleansing of areas where food is prepared and stored, and lack of hand washing before preparing and eating food. This is more common today because people have a false sense of security brought about from antibiotic drugs, however many new viruses and pathogenic bacteria resistant to antibiotics are emerging.

The excessive practise of feeding antibiotics to animals is contributing to the rising incidence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria such as E.coli, Staphylococcus and Salmonella. Other microorganisms that can cause food poisoning are Campylobacter, Listeria, Yersinia, Clostridium Botulinum and Shigella. Food poisoning can also occur from the toxins produced by some bacteria, algae and moulds. Shellfish grown in waters polluted with toxic algae bloom can accumulate their toxins, which can cause severe neurological dysfunction. Foods contaminated by certain moulds or fungi, which produce their own mycotoxins, can make you sick. The fungus Aspergillus flavus produces the dangerous mycotoxin called aflotoxin. This can grow on damp maize, wheat, corn, peanuts and some other crops.
People are eating out more and there is less cooking done in the home so it is difficult to control standards of food preparation for your family. People purchase foods from supermarkets where food may have travelled long distances and be stored or refrigerated for long periods, picking up microorganisms along the way. Many processed foods contain
preservatives, which do not eradicate microorganisms, but merely keep them in a dormant state. When this food gets into your intestines the preservatives are diluted and the bugs start to multiply. This is why it is important to purchase only fresh high quality foods. The risk of food contamination is increased by long storage times, the number of people who handle and package food, and inadequate cooling and re-heating temperatures.
The intensive mass production of animal meats has helped to spread infections in food supplies. Chickens fed stock-feed infected with the bacteria Salmonella (sometimes from the remains of other chickens), allow bacteria to recycle and multiply in the same way that cow cannibalism caused the epidemic of mad cow disease (BSE). Chickens infected with Salmonella or viruses, and other animals reared in crowded conditions, can easily cross-infect each other while alive or at the abattoir.

Tips For Good Hygiene
Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and hot water before preparing and eating food, and after handling any raw meat or seafood.

Only purchase fresh foods and avoid foods that are mouldy or look too old. Avoid processed or preserved meats such as hamburger meat, ham, smoked and pickled meats and fish, beef jerky, bacon, sausages, fritz, cabanossi, pizza meats, corned beef, meat loaf, rolled meats as found in delicatessens, and sea food that has been mishandled or poorly stored.
Do not let food stand in warm temperatures for more than two hours. Hot foods should be cooled quickly at room temperature and then refrigerated, because gradual cooling allows microorganisms to grow. For the same reasons, do not eat food that has been cooked, cooled and reheated more than once.

Refrigerate raw meat, seafood or chicken as soon as possible to reduce bacterial multiplication. Defrost poultry, seafood or meat in a microwave oven or overnight in the refrigerator and not on a counter. Cook all poultry, seafood and meat thoroughly because the centre of the food must reach 70°C (158°F) to kill bacteria.
Store raw meat and poultry at a lower level in the refrigerator to avoid their juices contaminating other foods. Always refrigerate eggs and foods containing eggs, and discard eggs with cracks.

Avoid nuts with mould on their shell or kernel, or those with a bitter taste.
Use antiseptics when cleaning the toilet, bath and shower recess. Antiseptic soaps can be used in large households or share type accommodation. Tea tree oil has useful antiseptic properties, and effective antiseptics are easily found in supermarkets and pharmacies at reasonable prices.

Avoid sharing toothbrushes and razor blades as serious blood borne infections can be transmitted this way.e nails with a nailbrush can remove inaccessible bacteria.
Wash kitchen utensils such as cutting boards, grinders, juicers, and blenders and can openers thoroughly after each use. Replace cloths and brushes regularly.

Jaundice

WHAT IS JAUNDICE?

The word “jaundice” comes from the French word jaune, which means yellow.

Jaundice is a yellowish staining of the skin, sclera (the white of the eyes), and mucous membranes by bilirubin, a yellow-orange bile pigment. Bilirubin comes mainly from the breakdown of red blood cells, and is basically a waste product that’s then disposed of by your liver.

Jaundice usually appears when the bilirubin in your blood is more than 3 mg per dL (51.3 µmol per L). The classic definition of jaundice is a serum bilirubin level greater than 2.5 to 3 mg per dL (42.8 to 51.3 µmol per L) as well as having yellow skin and eyes.

Your body processes bilirubin in 3 phases: prehepatic (before it gets to the liver), intrahepatic(whilst in the liver), and posthepatic(after leaving the liver). If any of these aren’t working properly you can become jaundiced.

PREHEPATIC

The human body produces about 4 mg per kg of bilirubin per day, from the breakdown of blood cells. Bilirubin is then transported from to the liver for conjugation (where it needs to link up with other enzymes and chemicals so that it can be removed from the body) .

INTRAHEPATIC

Unconjugated bilirubin is insoluble in water but soluble in fats. Therefore, it can easily cross the blood-brain barrier or enter the placenta. The unconjugated bilirubin is conjugated with a sugar via the enzyme glucuronosyltransferase (the enzyme that people with GS don’t have enough of) and is then soluble in the bile.

POSTHEPATIC

Once soluble in bile, bilirubin is transported through to the gallbladder, where it is stored, or passed on to the duodenam. Inside the intestines, some bilirubin is excreted in the stool, while the rest is dealt with by the bacteria in your gut.

JAUNDICE AND OTHER SYMPTOMS

Some people with jaundice have no symptoms at all.  But some may have an acute illness, which is frequently caused by infection, may seek medical care because of fever, chills, abdominal pain, and flu-like symptoms. For these patients, the change in skin color may not be their greatest concern!

Patients with noninfectious jaundice may complain of weight loss or itching / skin discomfort. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom in patients with pancreatic or biliary tract cancers.Even something as nonspecific as depression may be a symptom in patients with chronic infectious hepatitis and in those with a history of alcoholism.

‘False’ jaundice can happen if you eat foods rich in beta-carotene (e.g., squash, melons, and carrots). Unlike true jaundice, you don’t get yellow eyes, or changes in bilirubin level.

CAUSES OF JAUNDICE:

PREHEPATIC CAUSES

Unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (this is when you’ve too much bilirubin in your bloodstream because it’s not been processed in the liver, as in GS) might happen before bilirubin has entered the liver cells or within the liver cell. If you’ve had an unusual breakdown in your red blood cells then there may be too much of the waste product, bilirubin, for your liver to process as normal.

This will usually result in mild bilirubin elevation, to about 5 mg per dL (85.5 µmol per L), with or without clinical jaundice. The blood might be breaking down because of a number of causes in the blood cells or your enzymes which mean your red cells have stayed alive longer than normal, and built up.  Other causes include autoimmune disorders, drugs, and defects in hemoglobin structure such as sickle cell disease and the thalassemias.

INTRAHEPATIC CAUSES

Un-Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia Gilbert syndrome is a common, benign, hereditary disorder that affects approximately 5 percent of the U.S. population. It usually results in a mild decrease in the activity of the enzyme glucuronosyltransferase. Gilbert syndrome is typically an incidental finding on routine liver function tests, when the bilirubin level is slightly increased and all other liver function values are within normal limits. Jaundice and further elevation of the bilirubin level may occur during periods of stress, fasting, or illness.

Conjugated Hyperbilirubinemia. Main causes are when there’s a blockage preventing bilirubin from moving into the intestines. Viruses, alcohol, and autoimmune disorders are the most common causes of hepatitis. Inflammation also disrupts transport of the bilirubin and causes jaundice.

Hepatitis A can cause acute onset of jaundice. Hepatitis B and C infections often do not cause jaundice straight away, but can lead to jaundice when chronic infection has led to liver cirrhosis. Epstein-Barr virus infection occasionally causes hepatitis and jaundice that resolve as the illness clears.

Alcohol has been shown to affect bile acid uptake and secretion, stopping the normal flow through the liver. Chronic alcohol use may result in fatty liver (steatosis), hepatitis, and cirrhosis, with varying levels of jaundice. Fatty liver, the most common liver problem, usually results in mild symptoms without jaundice but occasionally progresses to cirrhosis. Hepatitis secondary to alcohol use typically presents with acute onset of jaundice and more severe symptoms.

More rare conditions that can cause jaundice: Autoimmune hepatitis traditionally has been considered a disease that affects younger persons, especially women. Two serious autoimmune diseases that directly affect the biliary system without causing much hepatitis are primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary biliary cirrhosis is a rare progressive liver disease that typically presents in middle-aged women. Fatigue and itching / skin discomfort are common initial complaints, while jaundice happens later. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is also rare, is more common in men; nearly 70 percent of patients also have inflammatory bowel disease. Dubin-Johnson syndrome and Rotor’s syndrome are rare hereditary metabolic defects that disrupt transport of conjugated bilirubin.

Common drugs can also cause problems, such as acetaminophen, penicillins, oral contraceptives, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), and estrogenic or anabolic steroids. Cholestasis can develop during the first few months of oral contraceptive use and may result in jaundice.

POSTHEPATIC CAUSES

Gallstones in the gallbladder are fairly common in adults. Obstruction within the biliary duct system can inflame the gallbladder, and can lead to infection. Cholangitis is diagnosed clinically by the classic symptoms of fever, pain, and jaundice, known as Charcot’s triad. Cholangitis most commonly occurs because of an impacted gallstone, which might then be removed.

Biliary tract tumors are uncommon but serious causes of posthepatic jaundice. Gallbladder cancer classically presents with jaundice, enlarged liver, and a mass in the right upper quadrant (Courvoisier’s sign). Another biliary system cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, typically manifests as jaundice, itching / skin discomfort, weight loss, and abdominal pain. It accounts for roughly 25 percent of hepatobiliary cancers.

Jaundice also may arise with pancreatitis. The most common causes of pancreatitis are gallstones and alcohol use. Gallstones are responsible for more than one half of cases of acute pancreatitis, which is caused by obstruction of the duct that drains the biliary and pancreatic systems.

Evaluation

The initial work-up of the patient with jaundice depends on whether the hyperbilirubinemia is conjugated (direct) or unconjugated (indirect). A urine anlysis that is positive for bilirubin indicates the presence of conjugated bilirubinemia. Conjugated bilirubin is water soluble and so passed through urine.

SO IF YOU’RE JAUNDICED WHAT DO THEY DO TO WORK OUT WHAT’S CAUSING IT? Here’s the clinical information :

BLOOD TESTING

First-line serum testing in a patient presenting with jaundice should include a complete blood count (CBC) and determination of bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and alkaline phosphatase levels.

Depending on the results of the initial tests, further serum tests or imaging studies may be warranted. The second-line serum investigations may include tests for hepatitis A IgM antibody, hepatitis B surface antigen and core antibody, hepatitis C antibody, and autoimmune markers such as antinuclear, smooth muscle, and liver-kidney microsomal antibodies. An elevated amylase level would corroborate the presence of pancreatitis when this condition is suspected based on the history or physical examination.

IMAGING

Ultrasonography and computed tomographic (CT) scanning are useful in distinguishing an obstructing lesion from hepatocellular disease in the evaluation of a jaundiced patient. Ultrasonography is typically the first test ordered, because of its lower cost, wide availability, and lack of radiation exposure, which may be particularly important in pregnant patients. While ultrasonography is the most sensitive imaging technique for detecting biliary stones, CT scanning can provide more information about liver and pancreatic parenchymal disease. Neither is good at finding stones inside the ducts.

Further imaging that may be done by a gastroenterologist or interventional radiologist includes endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography.

LIVER BIOPSY

A liver biopsy provides information on the architecture of the liver and is used mostly for determining prognosis. It also may be useful for diagnosis if serum and imaging studies do not lead to a firm diagnosis. Liver biopsy can be particularly helpful in diagnosing autoimmune hepatitis or biliary tract disorders (e.g., primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis).